Housing and Outing

Went out again today to look at a couple more houses that I had appointments to see, but no dice, again. Everyone I’ve talked with isn’t willing to work a land contract and I can’t get a fucking loan. I need a year or so to get my credit back up and in order. There’s no fucking rentals around due to people displaced from the flooding and many students are staying here because they are afraid they wont be let back in the country due to the Asshole in Chief, the person that stays part-time in the White House.

So after striking out again on housing, I went for a drive out past Copper Harbor to Horseshoe Harbor and went for a little hike and took some photos. I then went down the road further and made a loop back to Copper Harbor, along the shore and back home. Damn, the tourons are out in force today, driving fucking 40mph in 55mph zones, and they fucking wont pull over to let people pass.

Anyway, a bit about the rocks around Horseshoe Harbor…
The rocks at Horseshoe Harbor are 20-30, some areas closer to 40, feet high.
This is some of the oldest exposed bedrock on Earth.
These are the structures formed through sequences of volcanic activity separated by weathering and erosion. Initially, about a billion years ago, lava poured onto the Earth’s surface from openings created by a Mid-continent rift. The lava filled the valley created by the rift, and cooled rather quickly forming the basalt and rhyolite found here. During a time of little or no volcanic activity, weathering and erosion from the edge of the volcanic rift along with ancient mountains led to deposition of sediments in the rift valley. These two processes alternated over time. The immense weight caused the entire area to sink, and become cemented together. Finally, a collision of continental plates caused the entire rock formation to be tilted and revealed the structures that you see here today at Horseshoe Harbor. They are formed mainly of igneous rock, with a high percentage of densely formed basalt and rhyolite. Cementing the conglomerate structure is a small percentage of sedimentary rock such as shale and sandstone which are generally not as strong and durable as igneous formations.

Horseshoe Harbor

Horseshoe Harbor

Horseshoe Harbor 6 Image Pano

Horseshoe Harbor Conglomerate Ridge

Piece of Stromatolite from the Precambrian era and are the earliest known fossils on Earth. Stromatolite can be found throughout the Horseshoe Harbor area.

Pond Along Mandan Rd

Keweenaw Shore

Over A Month

It’s been over a month since I’ve been out to try and enjoy myself, and today I did, mostly anyway. I headed out Arvon Rd to Back Bear Rd and then on Peshekee Grade, knowing the end of Peshekee Grade is really crappy where it’s paved, but it’s still a nice drive. Along the way I stopped at Quartzite Falls, took a few photos and onward. Somewhere north of the Peshekee, I was driving along minding my own business, then started to notice my rear view mirrors getting dark, so I stopped. Got out to find I was being chased by a thunderstorm, and it was moving fast right at me.

Was good to get out, and it did some good to my head and soul, even if it was just a little bit.

Peshekee River

Peshekee River

Quartzite Falls

Quartzite Falls

Storm Chasing Me

Storm Clouds at Home

Warm Spring Hike Along The Slate River

Was a nice day for a hike in one of my favorite areas, the Slate River near Quartzite Falls and a number of other falls up stream, including one of my favorite spots of all, Grand Staircase Falls.
I drove up Arvon Rd. to All Wood Rd, crossed the bridge and parked. I started off checking out Quartzite Falls, but it was still mostly frozen over still, so I hiked back up to the road and started heading up stream, this was my original plan anyway.
I followed a deer path knowing it would be packed down. Every time I happen to step off that path, I sank in the snow past my knee. Then as I rounded a bend in the river, there it was, my spot, Grand Staircase Falls. Took off my gear, took some photos and just relaxed.

Grand Staircase Falls – Slate River

Quartzite Falls is still mostly frozen over

Along the Slate River

My Hiking Path along the Slate River

Roads can be muddy this time of year